The new core curriculum for basic education emphasises the joy of learning

Ministry of Education and Culture 25.3.2015 9.08
News item

The Finnish National Board of Education has confirmed the new core curriculum for basic education and it will be introduced in schools in August 2016. The new core curriculum emphasises the joy of learning and the pupils´ active role. Subject teaching is not being abolished although the new core curriculum for basic education will bring about some changes.

The core curriculum is based on the learning conception that positive emotional experiences, collaborative working and interaction as well as creative activity enhance learning.

The subject proportions have been renewed. Firstly, the content of each subject has been reduced. Secondly, the aims also emphasise the importance of learning environments and methods, guidance and individualisation as well as assessment as a means to support learning.

In order to meet the challenges of the future, the focus is on transversal (generic) competences and work across school subjects. Collaborative classroom practices, where pupils may work with several teachers simultaneously during periods of phenomenon-based project studies are emphasised.

The Finnish National Board of Education has confirmed the new national core curriculum for basic education. The core curriculum for basic education will be translated into English.

The new curriculum will be introduced in schools in August 2016

The national core curriculum includes the objectives and core contents of different subjects, as well as the principles of pupil assessment, special-needs education, pupil welfare and educational guidance. The principles of a good learning environment, working approaches as well as the concept of learning are also addressed in the core curriculum.

The present national core curriculum for basic education was confirmed in January 2004 and it was introduced in schools in August 2006. The new curriculum will be introduced in August 2016.

The education providers, usually the local education authorities and the schools themselves draw up their own curricula for pre-primary and basic education within the framework of the national core curriculum. These curricula may be prepared for individual municipalities or institutions or include both sections.

The Ministry of Education and Culture prepares the legislation and regulations for the education sector. The overall distribution of lesson hours for basic education and the minimum number of lessons for core subjects during basic education are decided by the Government.