Frequently asked questions

Here you can find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions.

If you couldn’t find the answer to your question on our website, you are also welcome to contact us kas@minedu.fi

How are you developing Finnish education during the next few years?

For more information on the development measures, see the publication Developing basic education over the years 2015-2019. http://www.minedu.fi/export/sites/default/pisa/liitteet/Perusopetuksen_kehittxmiseksi_kxynnissx_olevat_toimet_English.pdf

Is handwriting still taught in Finnish schools?

The new local curricula, which are based on the national core curriculum, came in to use in schools in August 2016. Changes in the teaching of cursive writing skills, in particular, have attracted international attention. A common misconception is that Finnish schools will abandon instruction in handwriting and focus exclusively on keyboard skills.

Read more (Finnish National Agency for Education)

Is there still subject teaching in Finnish schools?

The news that Finland has abolished teaching separate subjects has been an issue in the international press. Subject teaching is not being abolished although the new core curriculum for basic education brought some changes in August 2016.

Read more (Finnish National Agency for Education)

Do you have a canteen in your schools?

There is a lunch room in every school, lunch is free for the pupils. You can find more information about school meals in Finland here (Finnish National Agency for Education)

I want to take part in the KiVa school program. How can I do this?

KiVa is a research-based antibullying program that has been developed in the University of Turku, Finland, with funding from the Ministry of Education and Culture. However the ministry itself doesn’t oversee the program. For more information on KiVa school program go to: http://www.kivaprogram.net/

Has your country abolished private education?

Private schools (schools not operated by the government or local authorities) have not been abolished, though they are very rare: only two percent of all schools are private. Private schools, too, are publically funded and are free of cost because of this. Charging tuition in basic education is prohibited by the Finnish constitution.

I’m a teacher and I want to teach in Finland. How can I do that?

The Finnish National Agency for Education gives information on foreign teacher’s requirements.

 

I would like to study in Finland. What are my options?

General information about studying in Finland can be found here:

https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/

http://www.studyinfinland.fi/

https://finland.fi/facts-stats-and-info/study/

The Finnish National Agency for Education is in charge of international student mobility and the administration and implementation of Erasmus+:

http://cimo.fi

I have a NGO/project that needs funding. Are you able to assist?

Unfortunately the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture does not provide any funding for NGOs/ projects outside of Finland.

I want to create a school based on the Finnish educational system. Is this possible?

There are no programs in place to give accreditation or franchise our education system. Finnish schools are accredited through our domestic legislation and no foreign school can adopt the model or the name as such.

I want to start a school partnership with a Finnish school. How can you help?

Unfortunately we cannot help you directly as the ministry does not supervise municipal actions such as school partnership. There are quite many municipalities in Finland and they have their own guidelines for cooperation between schools. You should contact their education departments. You can find information via googling.

I want to visit the Ministry of Education and Culture or Finnish schools. Can you help?

Unfortunately, due to limited resources and the significant global attention the Finnish education system is currently receiving, the Ministry of Education and Culture has been forced to limit our services to government-level visits (ministry representatives and parliamentary groups).

However, as the Finnish system is rather decentralized, you can organize school visits directly with the local municipalities education authorities. While the City of Helsinki receives such a large number of visitors every year that they are forced to turn down many interested delegations, it will be much easier to arrange the visit to a school in other cities nearby. There are also several companies that specialize in organizing tailor-made educational visits (for a fee).

I want to have an internship in the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture. Is this possible?

Regrettably, due to policies about government internships, we’re not able to take foreign trainees to the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture.